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3/01/2011

Chandler's Wobble' may usher in a new ice age

Last week in 'Gems,' it was reported that NASA has discovered 'cracks' in the fluctuating earth's magnetic field.
This is worrisome, because this magnetic field affects the ionosphere, and particularly the winds in the lower troposphere. These 'cracks' in the magnetic field and the shifting of our planet's magnetic poles can lead to SUPER STORMS on virtually every continent like we've seen in recent months.


Last month's mega-monster cyclone 'Yasi' left much of northeastern Australia in Queensland a "war zone," according to rescue workers. This incredible storm packed winds near 190 miles per hour. Although it was labeled as a Category '5' cyclone (hurricane/typhoon), theoretically it was an 'off the scale' Category '6'!
Tens of thousands of homes were severely damaged or destroyed. Hundreds of people died. Livestock herds were decimated. There were reports of "sharks swimming through the flooded houses."
As if these worsening superstorms aren't enough, we have 'Chandler's Wobble' to worry about.
It was first discovered by an American astronomer in 1891 by the name of Seth Carlo Chandler. Chandler said that the earth "wobbles like a top" whenever our planet slows down a bit in its rotation like it has in recent years.
According to NASA, "the track of this spin began to slow down very slightly about Jan. 18, 2006." Since then, we've had a series of EXTREMELY HARSH winter seasons in both hemispheres.
If this 'wobble' of the planet continues, it's entirely possible that we will eventually see at least a new 'Little Ice Age,' maybe even a new GREAT ICE AGE like the one approximately 11,500 years ago.
But, in the meantime, most climate scientists are predicting increasing volcanic activity, which could lead to additional global cooling, more frequent earthquakes like the deadly tremor in New Zealand this past week, an increased number of deadly 'tsunamis,' colder and snowier winter seasons, cooler, shorter summer growing periods and more catastrophic superstorms resulting in widespread famines from food shortages.
Stay tuned. In this worst cycle of WIDE WEATHER 'EXTREMES' in at least 1000 years, virtually ANYTHING can happen, weatherwise and otherwise. Believe it!

CHANDLER WOBBLE
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